Cruise Crud

Just got back from our cruise and it seems that A LOT of people have "cruise crud" A lot of people are posting in my cruise specific Facebook group that they have coughing, laryngitis etc. My non husband started hacking up a lung the last 2 days of the cruise and lost his voice a little. I now have laryngitis and occasional coughing up phlegm and occasional thick snot. I have seen people post about this on previous cruises but was always fortunate enough to not get it. Just to be clear, our cruise was FANTASTIC!!! If I could do it all over, I would.
How many of you have taken a cruise and wound up with "cruise crud".

28 Answers



hat rules us out because we never fly. LOL

You're not the only one who doesn't fly...we avoid it at all costs. We remember when flying was part of the vacation fun...it stopped being that after 9/11...now, there are those who must...we don't have to so we don't. the whole thing is more than a hassle...the places we don't go to anymore because of it will live without us, and we don't mind at all..

This is the first I'm hearing of Cruise Crud. I have not encountered it yet (thankfully). I hope you all who aren't feeling well, feel better soon.

I hope you continue in that mode....I don't get it, but she has...and you know that ol expression..."when momma aint happy".. etc etc...

I usually suffer from The Cruise or Flying Crud after a longer trip:

Anything more than 3 hrs on an airplane, it takes me 24-72 hrs to clear up.

Anything more than 5 days on a cruise ship, it takes about 14 days to clear up...I believe it has something to do with the depression of being back to work, and recovering from drinking 18hrs a day for a week straight...

I also tend to avoid flying in for a cruise, but have had the cruds when cruising. We usually take 7 night or longer cruises, and I would have to say at least 1 out of 3 cruises one of us comes home feeling lousy.

I really do think it's a combination of things like people that feel OK when embarking but are in the incubation period of a cold or flu that becomes full blown while on board. Of course the recirculated air in the cabins and public indoor areas does not help, once these little buggers are on board.

Then you have in your ports of call exposure to pollens and insects that you might not encounter at home that wind-up triggering an allergic rhinitis. As someone that suffers frequent allergies I know that not all triggers cause an immediate reaction, and some can take a day before the nasal inflammation starts because of the prolonged exposure to pollen deposited on clothing or a slow release of enzymes from a bug bite.

Though most of us claim we are taking cruises (or any vacation for that matter) to relax, many have the tendencies to go, go ,go so we feel that we are getting our money's worth. Also all but the most vigilant of us tend to overeat, over drink (not even necessarily alcohol but sweetened beverages), or just experiment with new foods or beverages. For some not sticking to our regular sleep schedule or adjusting to a time change can lower our immune system. While for others overindulgence of foods and beverages does the same, especially if someone is pre-diabetic or has an underlying metabolic condition like hypothyroidism. For a few the new foods cause a mild adjustment reaction that mimics allergies.

Finally once many of us feel bad, there is a tendency to medicate. For those that don't know taking OTC symptom relief medication can mask the underlying cause making the the condition worst. Taking cold relief meds or decongestant when it's an allergic origin can dry out the nose making it easier for bacteria or viruses to take hold in the body. Conversely ingesting allergy meds when it's an infection just prolongs the cold. Taking both types of meds to hedge your bet can commonly lead to being overmedicated leaving some feeling run down.

The best any of us can do is to be proactive. Taking pre and probiotics starting at least 2 weeks before cruising and using preventives like Airborne once your traveling starts can help or if sailing during flu transmission season (Oct- Mar for USA departures) getting the flu shot at least a month before. Additional having topicals like Benadryl or Neosporin applied to bites and scapes as soon as noticed may helpful. Also using homeopathic relief products like nasal flushes at first instead of ingestible meds might provide congestion relief without masking the actual cause (better to wait at least 24 hours to see if a fever starts).Taking naps if off your sleep schedule can be beneficial as well. Bagging your "dirty" clothing will prevent pollen, spores, and other irritants from becoming free floating in the cabin air or suitcase and getting on your clean clothing and vacation bedding. Finally if feeling cruddy once home better to see a doctor or clinician than continuing to self treat. If allergies or inflammation is the cause a steroid pack in addition to symptom relief may be prescribed while if a cold or virus antibiotics or antivirals might be given.

That's a different problem, but equally common.Big Smile

For me personally, that post cruise depression is the most painful....gets me right......here....ugh....

That's a helluva post MARYRED...I felt ok when I started it,, but now...yuck....



We live within driving distance from NY and Baltimore. Flying would add more of an expense to our trip and more stress for me. I'd rather put the money toward a nicer room on the ship. I feel for those that are land locked and have to fly. There are bucket list trips that I will have to fly to so maybe someday.

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