Volunteerism & Cruising

Have you heard about Carnival's newest venture called Fanthom?  Beginning April 2016 this 710 passenger ship formerly the Adonis sailing 7-night cruises from Miami will offer passengers the opportunity to work alongside locals  on community projects such as teaching English, working in Agriculture or on Water filtration systems, etc. Carnival hopes that this first ship will be the start of more ships to follow.  Passengers would spend 3 days in the Dominican Republic on a 7-day cruise.  The cruise would run every other week on a Tuesday.  The cost of the cruise would start at $1,540.  Would this be something that you would consider?

Tags: Carnival Cruise Lines Dominican Republic Carnival Fanthom Volunteerism

14 Answers

I assume that Carnival is hoping to attract a sizable number of new passengers who otherwise would not consider cruising just to cruise.  The Adonia is a P & O Ship.

I have considered this one. On an earlier post I noted the concept is a good one, at least for me.

But not all share my thoughts on this matter.

I have three couples interested so far

We would not be doing this.  Great concept but not for us. We cruise for R&R, not to work more.  Plus, I do a lot of local volunteering that has an immediate impact in my own community. I don't need to cruise to another country to give some of my time to better someone else's quality of life, I can do that right at home.

I guess it could introduce some people to cruising that otherwise would not do it.  Myself,  I am semi retired,  if I do not work at home I'm certainly not going to pay to work for free. I think this used to be called an indentured servant.  

When I volunteer and make donations I do it for local issues.   There are enough people and causes here in the USA that need help that I do not need to be exported to help others. 

I could envision church groups doing this or service organizations.  There are lots of people out there who would like to volunteer but don't know where to start.  Others would do it for a short period of time but don't want a longer commitment.  This would be  ideal for them.  I was hoping that the cruise price would be lower to entice more participants. 

I agree,  with the cruise price it is more for the affluent then the average working person.

Agree the price is a bit higher than it should be considering there is a work aspect of the trip.

I am sure that Carnival has kept the price high for good reasons.  Perhaps they want passengers who are really interested it volunteering.  Perhaps their expenses are high.  Maybe they have to supply tools, materials and other supplies to the volunteer.  I am sure though that it will be a stumbling block to the average worker who otherwise would like to volunteer.  I am going to keep my eye on this and see how the concept develops.

A couple thoughts...

- passengers aren't volunteering on the Carnival ship itself. Aside from publicity for appearing to be a more socially conscious organization, it does not appear that Carnival directly benefits from the volunteerism although good will diplomacy goes a long way in negotiating port charges and other country-specific fees

- this is a smaller ship so the cost per passenger is more concentrated and economies of scale don't apply 

- faith-based organizations usually have well-established missionary networks and bases of operation in the host countries. I'm not sure spending money on cruise fare goes very well with the desire to spend most of the fundraising proceeds on the recipients

This is a good option for relatively affluent people who are not connected to any specific mission or charity to add in some volunteering as an excursion on an otherwise traditional cruise.  This goes along with the "theme" cruise ideation that many of the lines have adopted.

I think that Carnival benefits by getting more people to cruise on their ship who  would not cruise otherwise. It also is good PR for their company.  It makes them sound caring.    It will be interesting to see if they can continue to fill the ship every other week.

 

quote=CruisingCM]

A couple thoughts...

- passengers aren't volunteering on the Carnival ship itself. Aside from publicity for appearing to be a more socially conscious organization, it does not appear that Carnival directly benefits from the volunteerism although good will diplomacy goes a long way in negotiating port charges and other country-specific fees

- this is a smaller ship so the cost per passenger is more concentrated and economies of scale don't apply 

- faith-based organizations usually have well-established missionary networks and bases of operation in the host countries. I'm not sure spending money on cruise fare goes very well with the desire to spend most of the fundraising proceeds on the recipients

This is a good option for relatively affluent people who are not connected to any specific mission or charity to add in some volunteering as an excursion on an otherwise traditional cruise.  This goes along with the "theme" cruise ideation that many of the lines have adopted.

[/quote]

 

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