Is a Cheaper Price the Only Reason to Book an Inside Cabin?

Cruise Fever lists 7 reasons for booking an inside cabin and some of the reasons are pretty valid.  I doubt that i would ever do it again but it works for others and here is why. I would add in a couple of more reasons.  What do you think of inside cabins?

http://cruisefever.net/0710-7-benefits-for-booking-an-interior-cabin-on-a-cruise/

Tags: Cruise Fever Benefits of an inside cabin

11 Answers

I hate them! It's like being in a closet. I'm not claustrophobic that I know of, but I feel that way in an inside cabin. And I don't like not knowing whether it's day or night.

I don't hate them but we tend to book balconies now because they are a bit larger.  The point about sleeping in total darkness is what seals the deal for me. I sleep with an eye mask to block out light at home. It really helps me to stay asleep.

We like the inside cabins. Aside from the money savings, and the fact that we spend a great deal of time on deck(s). I like the option of total darkness. Yes, the size of the cabin can be an issue, but that can be overcome without to much difficulty. The inside I had on the Dawn was a wee bit bigger than the one I had on the Island Princess so I did not have to go out of the cabin to change my mind. Besides, the inside cabin is going to the same place at the mega suite---isn't it?

If it is a short cruise I'm good with an inside cabin.   I like the total black out for sleeping.  The only time I insist on a Balcony is on a long cruise with lots of days at sea, then I'll sit on the balcony to read a book.  On a short cruise about the only things I do in the cabin is sleep and shower,  I do not need a view for either of those.

The problem with booking a balcony cabin is,  once you have it,  you always want it and it is hard to go back to inside cabins.  

For us single people it can be a choice of sharing a balcony cabin with a friend or having an inside cabin alone for the same $.   I'd rather have my own inside cabin and bath  then share one.  When I travel in a cabin alone nobody complains if I snore or take long showers.

We book inside cabins 90 percent of the time. We don't have any problems with them. But if the price is right I'll book the balcony in a second. We have been very fortunate doing inside guarantee cabins, have had some nice upgrades. However, we have had a couple of clunkers also.

Luckily for us who don't like to stay in these cabins, there are others who do.  They help fill the cabins and keep prices lower for all of us.  Same thing for those who book suites.

 

 

Now here is good example why many of these cruise threads are informative and valuable. Prior to reading some of these comments, regarding inside rooms, I was relying solely on instinct when considering them, mostly negative. We have never had an inside cabin so I have no real time experience to go by. 

Some of the posters here offer some real logical reasons for booking these. Some stuff I never would have considered. Change my mind you have. Maybe we book one, just kidding, but thanks for the enlightening insights.           

 

    

We've had OV's, Balconies, and Insides. Also HC, which tend to be insides. Our feeling...why waste money on a cabin you aren't in that much.

Many cruise lines today would prefer you spend your time not in your cabin but out in their many events, eateries, venues, art shows, etc. all designed to entice you along with your wallet.  

So, by all means, if one doesn't expect to be in the cabin much, don't waste the extra dough on a balcony. We sailed for years with only outside view cabins, loved all those voyages too. But, like JusMe says: "The problem with booking a balcony cabin is, once you have it, you always want it and it is hard to go back to inside cabins." we knew that was going to be the case when we finally booked our first balcony. It was and we never looked back, today we don't book unless we get one. Matter of fact, I really don't believe we would cruise as much as we do if it were not for balconies.

Plus, we like a mini-suite where we can divide the cabin so one can read while the other sleeps or watches TV. I love the sea and spend a lot of time on the balcony, very therapeutic watching the flying fishes, etc. Plus one of the best aspects of the cruise for me are sail-aways, which are much more enjoyable on your own balcony. If you appreciate chatting with others at those times, which I do, then that is the time I make friends with guests on the adjacent balconies. Here are the wise words of wisdom from an unknown cruise thread:

"We feel that a balcony cabin is ridiculously worth it. Okay, hear me out those of you who are thinking you're never really in your room anyway, or it costs way too much.

Modern cruise ships feature more balconies than ever, so you are not paying for one of only 10 available verandah staterooms on a vessel, there are hundreds to choose from which really helps to bring the overall cost down.

Yes, you can always go on the top deck and take in the views, but there is nothing like having your own private balcony. Not only is there peace and quiet, the scenery changes constantly, whether you're sailing along the Inside Passage of Alaska or docked among the pink pastels of Bermuda, you have an almost constant view of some of the most beautiful destinations you'll ever see.

With floor-to-ceiling windows, a balcony not only makes the cabin feel larger, but it provides you with fresh air and natural light, both pretty important for humans. If you are one of those said humans but require absolute darkness to sleep, there are blackout curtains you can use to help you sleep-in in the morning.

Then when you do wake up, avoid the people crowds, order in breakfast, and say hello to dolphins, whales, bears, or other wildlife depending on your destination.

If you are taking time to go on a cruise you better treat yourself right — give yourself the best chance of having the most amazing vacation possible. And remember, the answer is YES a balcony is ridiculously worth it."

My sentiments exactly.

 

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