glomarrone
Contributor Level: Admiral

How to choose a good cabin

Here's a link to USA Today's suggestions for choosing a good cabin.  I hope that it helps first time cruisers. 

http://experience.usatoday.com/cruise/picture-gallery/gallery/2015/01/18/how-to-get-the-best-cruise-ship-cabin/21954341/

Tags: Choosing a good cabin USA Today

12 Answers

glomarrone
Contributor Level: Admiral

Most of us know all of this.  However, first time cruisers do not know enough to check what is above or under or even near their chose cabin.  It always bears repeating.  The photos of the cabins are beautiful.

AbigaylePhilips
Contributor Level: Purser

I appreciated this one, thanks for sharing :)

jcjl
Contributor Level: Cruise Director

 

By looking at the deckplans, you can get some good idea about what is around a cabin.  If the plan shows a undefined space, assume that it is related to the crew, or ships function, and hence may have late traffic, or machinery.

GTVCRUISER
Contributor Level: Captain

The price , above and below and hope for a upgrade

sarahcross
Contributor Level: Third Mate

Choosing the best cabin on a cruise ship is definitely a matter of personal choice, with cost and location being the primary decisions.

BDRebel
Contributor Level: Captain

Type of cabin (it must have a balcony or possibly only direct deck access, such as a lanai cabin) comes first with me. I will not sail in an outside or inside cabin (not a snob, just getting claustrophobic as I get olderBig Smile). Then a split between price and location (I prefer high up and toward the bow). For some reason, Princess seems to have these cabins at a lower price than the "more desirable" locations on the middle deck. Most other lines figure the higher the deck number, the higher the price.

MisterMet
Contributor Level: Captain

We always try to get mid ship, mid deck balconies.  DW a bit prone to sea sickness, plus the location never hurts.

DVCruise
Contributor Level: Captain

If you are booking a Princess Cruise online, it shows each deck (both public and private) and you can easily see where your cabin is in relation to anything above and below.  That said, I have never had any issues with noise above, below or on either side of the cabin and find them to be quite soundproof.

The cabin is where I sleep - not hang out - so I'm somewhat indifferent to location.

toontes
Contributor Level: Cruise Director

Another suggestion: Do not a book a cabin that is in high demand or are limited in quantity. I say this because if you want to reprice for a cheaper cruise value, it has to be apple to apple & if that category is gone, no reprice. We have an 8M (aft balcony) and there are only a handful...can't reprice if none are available.

 

RIGHT?!

AuntPinkie
Contributor Level: Captain

We always try to have cabins above and cabins below us. We have had some very sleepless nights and/or early mornings when we didn't follow this guideline.  You can't pick you neighbor when cruising and sometimes that can be problem.... crying baby, late night door slammers, college kids who are accustomed to dorm living (shouting up and down the corridor), and noisy newly weds (we never saw them but we heard themWink). Mostly the walls are thick enough to prevent ordinary noise from the adjoining cabins.

 

Very good post, BTW!

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