Fake News and the Cruise Industry

Fake news should be defined as something that is not true ... not just something you choose not to believe or accept...

As news spreads about our Caribbean Islands and ports we love to cruise to, are we getting the real facts about these destinations or are we being sold a bill of goods?

10 Answers

As cruise lines begin posting new ports to their itineraries, especially the island of St. Croix, some of the facts are getting distorted.  I love St Croix but there was a reason it was removed from a lot of the itineraries in the past decade.  Another example is the port of San Juan Puerto Rico.  If the mess is as bad as it sounds, porting there would seem to add to the chaos not help with the problem ...

As people begin cruising to these destinations post hurricanes, honest reviews of the good and bad are going to be extremely important to fellow cruisers.

So true! It is so helpful when folks here on the forum have direct (or nearly direct) information from people on the islands. We know it will take years to return to what was, but how soon things will be back to a status where cruisers will be helpful in boosting the economy is the big question. I don't trust the information from the media enough to make my opinion based on their information.  They might even be right this time... but .... I can't be sure.

Well the cruise lines have millions invested in the Caribbean.  I would imagine that they would pull and add ports based on the best available information and not just media reports.  At least, I sure hope so.

What is fake news ?

The fake news is that some of the cruise lines are showing ports on future itineraries that will NOT be worth stopping at ... meaning the port may be open but getting off the ship and being able to actually do anything are two different things.

It's to the cruise line's advantage to act like all is well ...I disagree that they have millions invested in the Caribbean ... the destinations are on their own ...

 

Examples? 

 

For a few days I was calling Carnival about ports being open and ports being closed and even though there is damage at most of them on our itinerary, Grand Turk was the one they were waiting on due to the amount of damage. They made the call and canceled the port for the cruise. With all the cruises still sailing, they were unable to find a port open for another ship to port making it a sea day.  For as much as I bash Carnival for their nickel and dime policies, I didn't find any fault with them waiting on the last minute to cancel the port.

I know I about to throw a stick at a honest nest, but I do not listen to the main street media and all their gloom and doom. 

Don’t confuse fake news with misinformation. People who write fake news stories are unscrupulous attention seekers who......Surprised......uhhhhhhh.....never mind.     Then there are people who simply don’t have the correct info at the time.

The truth will come out as more passenger go on cruises to the Caribbean.

The islands have a big interest in getting the ports open as soon as possible -- the cruise lines are a substantial part of their GDP.

Additionally, many of the cruise lines do have a monetary interest in some of the locations. CCL tends to build up their dock areas and wall them off from the locals.

Well, I can tell you this. Prices for New England / Canada cruises have gone up for next year.  

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