cruising

Once Boarding can you go straight to your room with your carry on, or do you need to participate in safety meetings or etc...

11 Answers

As we have discussed many many many many many times...on NCL you have to wait for an announcement that staterooms are ready.  and later you'll go to a mandatory muster drill...scan down for several threads on muster drills...sounds to me you're getting very very very very nervous about what is obviously you're first cruise.  calm down....you'll enjoy it more, and then you can come back an expert.

Not unless you're boarding later in the day.  Usually it takes a few hours for the rooms to be cleaned and cleared for passengers.  Gives you a few hours to wander around the ship.  Announcements are made around 1-2pm that rooms are ready.  You still enjoy the ship.  Even swim if you bring your suit in your carry -on .

You are given a time when you should go to your stateroom.

Flexiblefredy....... ask any questions you have,  do not worry if it has been asked before.    We are happy to answer them.   If you do not know the answer then chances are good others will benefit from the answer also.    

 

I know lots of questions before your first cruise,  we are here for you.  Back in the dark ages when I started cruising nowhere near the amount of questions because nowhere near the amount of options that modern cruising gives you.  I bet you will have a great time and you will get addicted just like the rest of us here.

 

As stated above Cabins are typically closed off until 1 or 2 in the afternoon the first day.   Lunch is served in the MDR and buffet when you get on.   If you wish to use the pool pack your swim wear in your carry on bag.   Bags that you give to the porters will be delivered to your cabin by 5 pm on most lines.   Keep all valuables in your carry on bags and all of your travel documents like ID and passports along with all RX meds and OTC meds that you pack just in case your checked bag gets misplaced (it happens rarely)

 

The life boat safety drill will happen at about 5 so you will have had time to drop bags in your cabin, have lunch, look around the ship and maybe unpack before the drill.

We have found that you may have to wait a few hours before your cabin is ready. A lot of this though depends upon when you board the ship. If you are one of the early or independent arrivals, then you may have to wait longer. We usually book the pre-cruise hotel package and transfer, so they pick us up at the hotel about noon, which often means our cabin is ready by the time we board.

 

Typically the ship arrives in the early morning, around 6:00 AM and disgorges guests from the previous voyage then departs again as a "new cruise" around 6:00 PM. This gives the cabin service staff very little time to prepared the cabins for the new arrivals, the average cabin steward or stewardess are given 22 mini-suites to prepare, mostly by themselves, which really becomes an issue when the old cruise guests are replaced by almost 100% new guests. Cabin staff with smaller cabins are given even more to take care of. Sometimes the ship is in port for a overnight before the new cruise begins, which is good, as the staff has more time to get ready.  

 

As far as muster stations for life boat drills. It appears to me some cruise lines appear to be falling all over themselves to avoid this safety practice. We just got off an over three week cruise where the line was conducting these like many of those with integrity once were. That is, upon the alarm head for the muster station, if in your cabin at the time, take your life jacket but do not put it on, if somewhere else, still go to your muster station, where they will give you life jackets. Do not return to your cabin then, as far as med's that still may be there, a crew member will be assigned to go retrieve those for you.  Once at the station they will go through the routine of having you put on your life jacket correctly. Then all will have an opportunity to go out onto the boat deck and stand beneath your assigned life boat.  

 

https://cruiseline.com/forum/post/muster-drills-how-do-the-different-lines-handle-it?page=2#answers

Thank you Justme, this is a very kind and informative response.  There are some who wish to try and belittle one with their knowledge, so your response is so appreciated. 

Justme, spoken like an Admiral.  Additionally Kennicott's information was also very very helpful., Thank you

 

Yes it was, if you happen to be on a line that still practices drills like they should be. On NCL, however, you wont need your lifejacket, they specifically tell you not to wear it.  Your muster station will be in someplace useful, like the auditorium where stage shows are held.  And as far as each and every crew member being "trained", its a good thought, but not reality.  Many speak almost no English. or pidgin at best.  And the occasional incident, at least as reported by guests, belies how helpful, or even informative they are.  There is no doubt in my mind that in  a true emergency, passengers can be counted on to do the wrong thing. Starting with going back to their cabins to get their "stuff". or ordering another drink.. And, fwiw, so will most of the crew. I haven't been in a 'true emergency" at sea...only on land...and people, being people, can be counted on to screw it up.

 

Well .. on NCL they tell you that you have to wait on the announcement that the rooms are ready but the last 2 times on NCL we went to our cabin early, located the steward doing his thing and asked if we could throw our bags in the closet and get out of his hair. He was very amenable to that plan so we made it so.

 Yep we did exactly that...but we've also run into hall doors (not firedoors) closed. Once I opened one, strolled down the hall, got into our cabin and proceded with the days activities.  Worst that can happen is you can't get in. that was on the PEARL...we actually had to wait...they had some folks stationed here n there to prevent getting in early..I think it varies from ship to ship, and how far along the stewards are...no biggie.

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